Tag Archives: Smart TVs

BlueBorne : Bluetooth Vulnerability Explained

Researchers from the security firm Armis have discovered a set of eight security vulnerabilities within the Bluetooth (defined) communications technology and responsibly disclosed (defined) them to affected device manufacturers. These are not present in the protocol layer of Bluetooth but within the implementation layer of Bluetooth which “bypasses the various authentication mechanisms, and enabling a complete takeover of the target device” (source). An estimated 5.3 billion devices are thought to be vulnerable ranging from computers tablets, smartphone, TVs, watches to Internet of Things (IoT) (defined) medical devices. This set of vulnerabilities is known as “BlueBorne”.

What is BlueBorne and why is it important?
Exploitation of the BlueBorne vulnerabilities allows the complete compromise of the vulnerable device and does not require the vulnerable device be paired (defined) with the attacking device.

Once exploited the vulnerabilities allow the attacker to conduct remote code execution (defined: the ability for an attacker to remotely carry out any action of their choice on your device)) and man in the middle attacks (defined). To begin the attack, the attacker does not need for the user of the vulnerable device to have taken any action.

These vulnerabilities are particularly severe since Bluetooth is less secured on a corporate network than for example, the proxy server (defined) providing internet access making spreading from advice to device in a worm (defined) like fashion (theoretically) possible. The Bluetooth protocol often runs with high privilege on devices and is not usually considered a potential entry point into a network. Air gapped systems (defined) are also potentially vulnerable.

How can I protect myself from these issues?
Software updates for some devices are listed here (for Google, Linux and Microsoft devices). Recent Apple devices were found not to be vulnerable. A full list of affected devices and the software updates to protect them are listed here and will be updated by Armis.

For users of Google Android devices, they can check if their device is vulnerable by downloading the BlueBorne Android app. Disabling Bluetooth if you are not using it and only leaving it enabled for the time you are using it are also good security practices. Once your devices are updated, you should be able to resume normal Bluetooth usage. Please not that not all devices will or can be updated due to end of support lifecycles, newer products and product limitations. It is estimated approximately 2 billion devices will not receive software updates to resolve these issues.

Thank you.

Protecting Your Smart TV From Ransomware

In mid-2016 a news article detailed the possibility for Android powered Smart TVs to be infected by ransomware. Last month that prediction came true.

To recover the affected TV, you should reset it to factory default settings. You may need to contact the manufacturer if they don’t provide the steps to perform the reset as part of the devices documentation.

With 2017 predicted to break the record set in 2016 for ransomware, occurrences such as this will likely become more common.

Unfortunately, TV manufacturers are unlikely to pre-harden vulnerable devices before shipping them due to compatibility concerns and increased costs (during manufacturing and later support costs). To increase use of their after sales service they are again unlikely to publish the key sequences or button presses to perform a factory reset.

The ransomware encountered by this software developer was “just” a screen locker. It didn’t also try to encrypt any connected USB drives. Separately, a Symantec security researcher published a helpful list of mitigations to protect against ransomware targeting Smart TVs.

Continuing the trend of protecting Internet of Things (IoT) devices (defined), I hope that you find the above mitigations useful. Please also refer to this previous blog post for more general advice on preventing ransomware infections on your everyday computing devices (non IoT devices).

Thank you.