Tag Archives: Public Disclosure

WD Releases My Cloud NAS Firmware Updates

In the first half of 2017 I posted about vulnerabilities being publically (defined) within Western Digital (WD) My Cloud NAS devices. This vulnerability was designated as CVE-2018-17153 (defined).

Why should this vulnerability be considered important?
The vulnerability is relativity easy for an attacker to exploit without them needing to authenticate/login to the device. They need only to set the username=admin’ cookie to obtain admin/privileged access to the device due to a network CGI (defined) module containing a command that begins an administrative session tied to the IP address of the device but the attacker must first set bind the admin session to the IP address. They only then need to call the remote system and authenticate using the cookie with the value set (as detailed above).

Of even more concern than above; an attacker could leverage this vulnerability using a CSRF (CSRF, defined here and here)) attack within a malvertising (malicious adverts) (defined) campaign allowing them to compromise WD devices which are not connected to the internet. Separately; there was more than security researcher who discovered this vulnerability; I previously mentioned a researcher by the name of Zenofex; who not only contacted WD but the company refused to acknowledge r fix the issues raised. The group Zenofex is part of disclosed the vulnerability (along with other security concerns) during the Def Con security conference in 2017 and created a Metasploit module (defined). In mid-September it was estimated that there were more than 1,800 vulnerable WD devices visible online.

How can I protect myself from this vulnerability (and the other security concerns raised)?
If you own any of the devices listed below; please follow the links below to download and install updated firmware using the steps that WD provides:

Many thanks to BleepingComputer.com for these convenient links.

=======================

The firmware updates resolve many than the vulnerability discussed above (the updated OpenSSL, OpenSSH, jQuery and libupnp will also have significant security improvements). For example, please find below the list for the “My Cloud FW 2.31.149”:

Security Fixes

  • Resolved multiple command injection vulnerabilities including CVE-2016-10108 and CVE 2016-10107.
  • Resolved multiple cross site request forgery (CSRF) vulnerabilities.
  • Resolved a Linux kernel Dirty Cow vulnerability (CVE-2016-5195).
  • Resolved multiple denial-of-service vulnerabilities.
  • Improved security by disabling SSH shadow information.
  • Resolved a buffer overflow issue that could lead to unauthenticated access.
  • Resolved a click-jacking vulnerability in the web interface.
  • Resolved multiple security issues in the Webfile viewer on-device app.
  • Improved the security of volume mount options.
  • Resolved leakage of debug messages in the web interface.
  • Improved credential handling for the remote MyCloud-to-MyCloud backup feature.
  • Improved credential handling for upload-logs-to-support option.

Components Updated

  • Apache – v2.4.34
  • PHP – v5.4.45
  • OpenSSH – v7.5p1
  • OpenSSL – v1.0.1u
  • libupnp – v1.6.25 (CVE-2012-5958)
  • jQuery – v3.3.1 (CVE-2010-5312)

=======================

If firmware is not yet present for your WD My Cloud NAS device, please follow the recommended steps from my previous post on WD My Cloud devices. Protecting these devices is especially important since NAS devices are often used for backups and to store precious/valuable data. Please also contact WD Customer Service to enquire about an update becoming available for your device.

Thank you.

SpectreRSB and NetSpectre Vulnerabilities Explained

In late July; security researchers publicly disclosed (defined) a new set of vulnerabilities within Intel CPUs (defined) (and possibly AMD and ARM; which the researchers also notified). These vulnerabilities are collectively referred to as SpectreRSB (Return Stack Buffer). The purpose of an RSB is explained in this document (PDF) but in summary it is a buffer (defined) that stores multiple return addresses while attempting to predict function (a set of instructions that carries out a specific action within a program) return addresses.

A very short time later nearing the end of July; a separate set of researchers released details of another vulnerability known as NetSpectre. This is an evict and reload cache attack that targets systems remotely to extract data.

How could an attacker exploit these vulnerabilities and what is the result?
For SpectreRSB; an attacker could recover data from the speculative execution feature of the CPU by targeting the Return Stack Buffer and predicting the return address which it stores. By manipulating the data it contains by predicting the return address the CPU will access when it completes a task the attacker can influence the address CPU will jump to and thus jump to an address of the attacker’s choosing. Unfortunately; this buffer is shared among the threads (defined) on the same virtual process thus affecting multiple running processes and virtual machines.

The attacker could alter the RSB to expose and gather data from applications running within the CPU. Another form of manipulation by the researchers resulted in them being able to expose data contained within Intel’s Software Guard Extensions (defined)(PDF).

====================

Separately for the NetSpectre vulnerability; if attackers can send specifically crafted packets (defined) to a vulnerable system they can use the responses they receive to infer data from that systems memory. Currently this can only take place at a very low rate; 15 bits per hour. This means 15 times a zero or a one; in other words true or false (I’m not referring to Boolean logic here; just trying to convey a concept) or even simpler on for 1 and off for zero. This increased to 60 bits per hour for an Intel CPU equipped with AVX2 instructions.

With such a low throughput at this time (although I realise an attack can usually be refined and significantly improved within a short time); this attack is not a practical threat but more a theoretical weakness.

How can I protect myself from these vulnerabilities?
The good news for this SpectreRSB subclass of vulnerabilities is that Intel has already created an update but not for all of it’s CPU (Intel Core i7 Skylake (6th Generation Core models) and later CPUs). The researchers are aware of this patch and are recommending it’s use. When I use the word subclass above; my meaning is that SpectreRSB is a subclass of the original Spectre vulnerabilities from January this year. Red Hat also announced they are reviewing these vulnerabilities.

Intel however have stated that existing mitigations from the vulnerabilities disclosed in January will protect against this new subclass. However this is unconfirmed at this time.

====================

While an APT (defined) could leverage the NetSpectre vulnerability over a period of weeks or months to extract useful data; existing mitigations for Spectre variant 1 and variant 2 mitigate this new vulnerability reinforcing my statement above of being a theoretical weakness.

In summary; to protect against both classes of these vulnerabilities; please continue to roll-out the mitigations for the Spectre vulnerabilities from January 2018 (if you have not already completed them).

For any system which cannot be updated (due to performance or end of life constraints e.g. Intel not providing updates for some CPUs); seek to migrate the responsibilities/roles/duties of these systems to newer CPUs which have received updates. A list of patched and un-patched Intel CPUs is available here (PDF).

Thank you.

VPNFilter: Overview and removal

====================
Update: 24th October 2018:
====================
Researchers from Cisco’s Talos team have discovered further capabilities of this malware. As detailed below the 3rd stage of the malware features:

Provides plugins for the RAT (defined below in the original post) to extend its functionality.

However, the team was able to determine the following extra capabilities:

  1. Packet sniffing (obtain information from passing data packets (defined) on a network connection)
  2. JavaScript (defined) injection used to deliver exploit (a small piece of software used to trigger a known vulnerability to the advantage of an attacker) to a compromised device (most likely a router).
  3. Encrypted tunnelling (defined) to hide data the malware steals as well as the existing command and control data traffic.
  4. Creating network maps (defined)
  5. Remote connection/administration via SSH (Secure Shell)(defined)
  6. Port forwarding (defined)
  7. Create SOCK5 (defined) proxies (defined)
  8. DDoS (defined)

The good news about this malware is that from the Talos team’s research it does not appear that any malware samples remain active. However; they caution it is not possible to assume that this malware has finished its malicious actions and the possibility of its return remains.

Thank you.

====================
Update: 20th June 2018:
====================
If you would prefer a video or a podcast of how to remove this malware from your router, this Sophos blog post provides links to both. The video is hosted on Facebook but a Facebook account isn’t required to view it. Sophos also provide an archive of previous videos on the same Facebook page.

Thank you.

====================
Update: 6th June 2018:
====================
The Cisco Talos team have provided an updated list of known affected routers. I have added these to the list below with “(new)” indicating a new device on the existing list. I have also updated the malware removal advice to provide easier to follow steps.

Thank you.

====================
Original Post:
====================
In late May; a strain of malware known as VPNFilter affecting routers from the vendors listed below was publicly disclosed by the Cisco Talos team:

Affected vendors:
Asus RT-AC66U (new)
Asus RT-N10 (new)
Asus RT-N10E (new)
Asus RT-N10U (new)
Asus RT-N56U (new)
Asus RT-N66U (new)
D-Link DES-1210-08P (new)
D-Link DIR-300 (new)
D-Link DIR-300A (new)
D-Link DSR-250N (new)
D-Link DSR-500N (new)
D-Link DSR-1000 (new)
D-Link DSR-1000N (new)
Huawei HG8245 (new)
Linksys E1200
Linksys E2500
Linksys E3000 (new)
Linksys E3200 (new)
Linksys E4200 (new)
Linksys RV082 (new)
Linksys WRVS4400N
Mikrotik CCR1009 (new)
Mikrotik Cloud Core Router (CCR) CCR1016
Mikrotik CCR1036
Mikrotik CCR1072
Mikrotik CRS109 (new)
Mikrotik CRS112 (new)
Mikrotik CRS125 (new)
Mikrotik RB411 (new)
Mikrotik RB450 (new)
Mikrotik RB750 (new)
Mikrotik RB911 (new)
Mikrotik RB921 (new)
Mikrotik RB941 (new)
Mikrotik RB951 (new)
Mikrotik RB952 (new)
Mikrotik RB960 (new)
Mikrotik RB962 (new)
Mikrotik RB1100 (new)
Mikrotik RB1200 (new)
Mikrotik RB2011 (new)
Mikrotik RB3011 (new)
Mikrotik RB Groove (new)
Mikrotik RB Omnitik (new)
Mikrotik STX5 (new)
Netgear DG834 (new)
Netgear DGN1000 (new)
Netgear DGN2200
Netgear DGN3500 (new)
Netgear FVS318N (new)
Netgear MBRN3000 (new)
Netgear R6400
Netgear R7000
Netgear R8000
Netgear WNR1000
Netgear WNR2000
Netgear WNR2200 (new)
Netgear WNR4000 (new)
Netgear WNDR3700 (new)
Netgear WNDR4000 (new)
Netgear WNDR4300 (new)
Netgear WNDR4300-TN (new)
Netgear UTM50 (new)
QNAP TS251
QNAP TS439 Pro
Other QNAP NAS devices running QTS software
TP-Link R600VPN
TP-Link TL-WR741ND (new)
TP-Link TL-WR841N (new)
Ubiquiti NSM2 (new)
Ubiquiti PBE M5 (new)
UPVEL Unknown Models* (new)
ZTE ZXHN H108N (new)

Why should this malware be considered important?
The authors (thought to be a group funded by a nation state) of this malware are using it to hijack vulnerable routers (500,000 are known to have been compromised across 54 countries) for possible use in cyberattacks against the Ukraine. Indeed, the malware more recently began seeking out Ukrainian routers specifically. The Ukrainian Secret Service issued a security alert on this on the 23rd of May.

The malware has the ability to do so by utilising previously publicly disclosed (defined) vulnerabilities to gain access and persistence (namely remaining present after the router is powered off and back on) within these routers. Last week the FBI took control of this botnet and are now working to clean up the affected devices.

The malware is very sophisticated and can persist within a router even if the router is powered off and back on (becoming the second malware to have this ability, the first being the Hide and Seek botnet). The malware is made up of 3 stages:

Stage 1: Is responsible for the persistence (mentioned above).
Stage 2: Providing the capabilities of a remote access Trojan (RAT)(defined)
Stage 3: Provides plugins for the RAT to extend it’s functionality.

The malware also has the capability to do the following:

  1. Wipe the firmware (see Aside below for a definition) of routers rendering them useless
  2. Inspect the data traffic passing through the router (with the possible intention of obtaining credentials passing over the wire to gain access to sensitive networks)
  3. Attempt to locate ICS/SCADA devices (defined) on the same network as the router by seeking out port 502 traffic, namely the Modbus protocol (defined) with the option of deploying further malware
  4. Communicate via the Tor network (definition in the Aside below).

How can I protect my devices from this malware?
The FBI are asking anyone who suspects their internet router to be infected to first reboot it (turn on and off the router). This will cause an infected device to check-in with the now under FBI control C&C (command and control, C2 (defined) server to provide them with a better overview of the numbers of infected devices.

To completely remove the malware; reset the device to factory defaults (this won’t harm a non-infected either but please ensure you have the necessary settings to hand to re-input them into the router, your internet service provider (ISP) will be able to help with this). This will remove stage 1 of the malware (stage 2 and 3 are removed by turning the router on an off).

To prevent re-infection: Cisco Talos’ team recommendations are available from this link. Moreover the US CERT provide recommendations here and here. Symantec’s recommendations are provided here (especially for Mikrotik and QNAP devices).

Further advisories from router manufacturers are as follows (their advice should supersede any other advice for your router model since they know their own devices the best):

Linksys
MiktroTik
Netgear
QNAP
TP-Link

Further recommendations from Sophos are:

  • Check with your vendor or ISP to find out how to get your router to do a firmware update.
  • Turn off remote administration unless you really need it
  • Choose strong password(s) for your router
  • Use HTTPS website where you can

A very useful and easy to follow step by step walk through of removing this malware by BleepingComputer is available from this link with useful guidance for multiple router models.

Thank you.

=======================
References:
New VPNFilter malware targets at least 500K networking devices worldwide : Cisco Talos team
=======================

=======================
Aside:
What is firmware?
Firmware is semi-permanent embedded software code that allows a device to carry out its function by having the low-level hardware carry out useful sequences of events.

What is The Onion Router (Tor)?
The Onion Router (Tor) is an open source (defined) project with the goal of protecting your privacy by passing your web browsing activity through a series of anonymous relies spread across the internet. These relays act like proxy servers which encrypt and randomly pass the traffic they receive from relay to relay.

This web of proxies is sometimes referred to as the Dark web (a portion of the internet only accessible using the Tor network). This makes tracing the source of the source almost impossible.
=======================

WPA2 KRACK Vulnerability: What you need to know

Last Sunday, the early signs of a vulnerability disclosure affecting the extensively used Wi-Fi protected access (WPA2) protocol were evident. The next day, disclosure of the vulnerability lead to more details. The vulnerability was discovered by  two researchers Mathy Vanhoef and Frank Piessens of the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (KU Leuven) while examining OpenBSD’s implementation of the WPA2 four way handshake.

Why should this vulnerability be considered important?
On Monday 16th October, the KRACK (key re-installation attacks) vulnerability was disclosed. This vulnerability was found within the implementation of the WPA2 protocol rather than any single device making it’s impact much more widespread. For example, vulnerable devices include Windows, OpenBSD (if not already patched against it), Linux, Apple iOS, Apple macOS and Google Android.

If exploited this vulnerability could allow decryption, packet replay, TCP connection hijacking and if WPA-TKIP (defined) or GCMP (explained) are used; the attacker can inject packets (defined) into a victim’s data, forging web traffic.

How can an attacker exploit this vulnerability?
To exploit the vulnerability an attacker must be within range of a vulnerable Wi-Fi network in order to perform a man in the middle attack (MiTM)(defined). This means that this vulnerability cannot be exploited over the Internet.

This vulnerability occurs since the initial four way handshake is used to generate a strong and unique key to encrypt the traffic between wireless devices. A handshake is used to authenticate two entities (in this example a wireless router and a wireless device wishing to connect to it) and to establish the a new key used to communicate.

The attacker needs to manipulate the key exchange (described below) by replaying cryptographic handshake messages (which blocks the message reaching the client device) causing it to be re-sent during the third step of the four way handshake. This is allowed since wireless communication is not 100% reliable e.g. a data packet could be lost or dropped and the router will re-send the third part of the handshake. This is allowed to occur multiple times if necessary. Each time the handshake is re-sent the attacker can use it to gather how cryptographic nonces (defined here and here) are created (since replay counters and nonces are reset) and use this to undermine the entire encryption scheme.

How can I protect myself from this vulnerability?
AS described in this CERT knowledge base article.; updates from vendors will be released in the coming days and weeks. Apple (currently a beta update) and Microsoft already have updates available. OpenBSD also resolved this issue before the disclosure this week.

Microsoft within the information they published for the vulnerability discusses how when a Windows device enters a low power state the vulnerable functionality of the wireless connection is passed to the underlying Wi-Fi hardware. For this reason they recommend contacting the vendor of that Wi-Fi hardware to request updated drivers (defined).

Links to affected hardware vendors are available from this ICASI Multi-Vendor Vulnerability Disclosure statement. Intel’ security advisory with relevant driver updates is here. The wireless vendor, Edimax also posted a statement with further updates to follow. A detailed but easy to use list of many vendors responses is here. Since I use an Asus router, the best response I could locate is here.

======
Update: 21st October 2017:
Cisco have published a security advisory relating to the KRACK vulnerability for its wireless products. At the time of writing no patches were available but the advisory does contain a workaround for some of the affected products.
======

The above updates are software fixes but updates will also be made available for devices in the form of firmware updates e.g. for wireless routers, smartphones and Internet of Things (IoT)(defined) devices. For any wireless devices you own, please check with the manufacturer/vendor for available updates with the above CERT article and vendor response list detailing many of the common vendors.

Thank you.

Punycode makes phishing harder to detect

In mid-April, security researcher Xudong Zheng publicly disclosed (defined) and provided a demonstration of a security vulnerability within popular web browsers e.g. Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox and Opera which may be used in phishing (defined) attacks.

Why should this vulnerability be considered important?
This vulnerability is not the first of kind, e.g. a similar vulnerability exists in how the DNS protocol resolves device hostnames (defined) (when combined with Service Discovery (SD) provides the capability of network resource distribution beyond the reach of multicast normally limited by the MAC Bridge.
However this vulnerability has the potential to allow an attacker to lead you into clicking a legitimate looking link which may lead to an unexpected website (which an attacker can populate with content of their choice). This may happen since an attacker can send you a highly targeted email (i.e. spear phishing) which you may be expecting and inadvertently click an undesired link or enter login details into a legitimate looking website (following a link from such an email).

Mr. Zheng demonstrates how this vulnerability exploits how web browsers translate letters from other non-Latin languages into Latin letters. For example, he registered the website of apple.com which when visited actually displays the website of xn--80ak6aa92e.com but your web browser will still show apple.com This occurs due to the translation of non-Latin letters into Latin characters making use of Punycode (a recognized standard of the Internet Engineering Task Force).

How can I protect myself from this vulnerability?
While the conventional advice of hovering over any link before clicking to view its actual destination is not redundant it is now significantly less useful.

If you use a password manager which works with your web browser it will not enter your username/password into a website translated from its Punycode. For example, your Apple credentials would not be entered into xn--80ak6aa92e.com

Google has addressed this vulnerability with the release of Chrome version 58. Opera also resolved this issue. Mozilla is currently considering the best means to resolve this vulnerability (Firefox 53 mistakenly shows apple.com) . In the meantime; Mozilla Firefox users can use the steps mentioned at the end of this news article to mitigate this issue.

For any website important to you, please manually type its address into your web browsers address bar to visit the legitimate website. Using encrypted connections where possible is encouraged e.g. https://twitter.com or https://mail.google.com

Thank you.

“DoubleAgent” Vulnerability Disclosure: What you need to know

In late March a security vulnerability was disclosed by the Israeli security firm Cybellum. However this was no ordinary public disclosure as I will explain below. Apologies for the untimely nature of this blog post due to other commitments:

What made this disclosure different?
At first glance this disclosure appeared very serious. It discussed the use of the Microsoft Application Verifier present within Windows XP up to and including Windows 10. They detail the leveraging of this tool to add a customised verifier DLL (defined) to hijack any legitimate process (defined) within Windows.

They demonstrated this attack against anti-malware software specifically Norton Security (by Symantec) resulting in a rogue DLL being injected (defined here and here) into the Norton process (ns.exe as demonstrated within their YouTube video). Despite claims by Cybellum security firms such as Avira and Comodo have reported this attack cannot bypass the self-protection features within their products. The full list of capabilities this attack provides is within this news article.

Windows Internals expert; Alex Ionescu later revealed the researchers from Cybellum used his work concerning protected processes to create this exploit and this was already a known issue. As was pointed out in the Twitter timelines linked to below once an attacker has administrative control over your system they could simply uninstall your security software rather than trying to bypass rendering the threat of this exploit far less important/relevant.

Twitter Timeline 1
Twitter Timeline 2
Twitter Timeline 3
Twitter Timeline 4
Twitter Timeline 5

Does this disclosure only affect security software?
It’s important to note this attack potential affects all software on Windows rather than just security software. In addition the proof of concept (PoC) exploit requires no changes for any application you choose to attack. Security software was chosen since almost all systems have anti-malware software installed and their process names are trusted (and allowed within application white listed (defined) environments).

How can I protect myself from this exploit?
Since this attack requires administrative privileges (defined) on Windows to have the intended effect, using a standard user account for everyday use will mitigate this attack.

From the various statements issued by the affected anti-malware vendors (listed below) please ensure your anti-malware software is the latest version available to ensure this attack is ineffective.

Traditional defences such patching your operating system, your web browser and being cautious of the attachments you open will also reduce the risk posed by this attack.

NetworkWorld Anti-Malware Vendor Responses

Malwarebytes Anti-malware

Symantec Endpoint Protection

Symantec Endpoint Protection Affected Versions

Thank you.

December 2016 Security Updates Summary

Today Microsoft and Adobe released their scheduled monthly security updates, the final scheduled set from both vendors for 2016.

Microsoft’s made 12 bulletins available. These updates address 47 vulnerabilities listed within Microsoft’s security bulletin summary (as before excluding the Adobe bulletin). These are more formally known as CVEs (defined).

As with previous months, fortunately this month (so far) there are no Known Issues detailed within the above mentioned summary page. Monitoring that page before deploying the updates as well as the IT Pro Patch Tuesday blog will keep you well informed enabling you to have the best opportunity to avoid potential issues. If any issues do arise, those pages should be your first places to check for solutions.

====================
Adobe made available 9 security bulletins which included their regular Flash Player update. Depending on which version of Flash Player you have, please review the Adobe security bulletin or Microsoft bulletin as appropriate and apply the recommended updates. Google Chrome users will have the updated installed automatically alongside the updated version of Google Chrome which will most likely be made available by Google either later today or in the next 1 to 2 days.

The Flash Player update addresses 17x priority 1 CVEs. All of Adobe’s priority rating are explained in the previous link. The other 8 security bulletins can be summarised as follows:

Adobe Animate (APSB16-38): Addresses 1x priority 3 CVE.
Adobe Experience Manager Forms (APSB16-40): Addresses 2x priority 3 CVEs.
Adobe DNG Converter (APSB16-41): Addresses 1x priority 3 CVE.
Adobe Experience Manager (APSB16-42): Fixes 4x priority 2 CVEs.
Adobe InDesign (APSB16-43): Fixes 1x priority 3 CVE.
Adobe ColdFusion Builder (APSB16-44): Fixes 1x priority 2 CVE.
Adobe Digital Editions (APSB16-45): Fixes 2x priority 3 CVEs.
Adobe RoboHelp (APSB16-46): Fixes 1x priority 3 CVE.

If you use Flash or any of the above products, please review the security bulletins linked to above and apply the necessary updates.

You can monitor the availability of security updates for the majority of your software from the following websites (among others) or use Secunia PSI:

—————
US Computer Emergency Readiness Team (CERT) (please see the “Information on Security Updates” heading of the “Protecting Your PC” page):

https://www.us-cert.gov/

A further useful source of update related information is the Calendar of Updates.

News/announcements of updates in the categories of General Software, Security Software and Utilities are available on their website. The news/announcements are very timely and (almost always) contain useful direct download links as well as the changes/improvements made by those updates (where possible).

If you like and use it, please also consider supporting that entirely volunteer run website by making a donation.
—————

If you use any of the above software, please install the appropriate updates as soon as possible. Steps for installing updates for Windows are provided on the “Protecting Your PC” page.

As always; to assist with making the best use of your time when deploying these updates, I will prioritise the updates for you below:

This month is a little different than before since the Microsoft Internet Explorer and Microsoft Edge bulletins when combined address 6 vulnerabilities that are already publicly disclosed (defined). These should be followed by the Adobe Flash update which addresses a zero day vulnerability (defined). Next up would be Microsoft Office, the Windows Graphics component and the Microsoft Uniscribe update due to their criticality.

The remaining security updates can be installed when you have the time to do so. Detailed information on the contents of each security bulletin is published each month within ComputerWorld’s Patch Tuesday Debugged column.

Another security pre-caution that you may wish to take if you have Microsoft EMET (please ensure your version of EMET is the most recent version 5.5) installed is to use it to protect you from Adobe Flash being used to exploit vulnerabilities when you open a Microsoft Office document or Adobe PDF file. I provide recommendations of how to do this at the end of the July 2015 Update Summary.

Please note that Microsoft EMET is in the process of being retired with the end of support scheduled for the 31st of July 2018.

As is my standard practice, I would recommend backing up the data on any device for which you are installing updates in order to prevent data loss in the rare event that any update causes unexpected issues.

Thank you.