Tag Archives: IoT

Protecting Your Smart TV From Ransomware

In mid-2016 a news article detailed the possibility for Android powered Smart TVs to be infected by ransomware. Last month that prediction came true.

To recover the affected TV, you should reset it to factory default settings. You may need to contact the manufacturer if they don’t provide the steps to perform the reset as part of the devices documentation.

With 2017 predicted to break the record set in 2016 for ransomware, occurrences such as this will likely become more common.

Unfortunately, TV manufacturers are unlikely to pre-harden vulnerable devices before shipping them due to compatibility concerns and increased costs (during manufacturing and later support costs). To increase use of their after sales service they are again unlikely to publish the key sequences or button presses to perform a factory reset.

The ransomware encountered by this software developer was “just” a screen locker. It didn’t also try to encrypt any connected USB drives. Separately, a Symantec security researcher published a helpful list of mitigations to protect against ransomware targeting Smart TVs.

Continuing the trend of protecting Internet of Things (IoT) devices (defined), I hope that you find the above mitigations useful. Please also refer to this previous blog post for more general advice on preventing ransomware infections on your everyday computing devices (non IoT devices).

Thank you.

Blog Post Shout Out: New Wireless Routers Enhance Internet of Things Protection

Happy New Year to all readers of this blog!

With attacks on routers increasing (e.g. this article concerning D-Link) and vulnerabilities being patched within internet of things (IoT) (defined) devices; it’s great news that security technologies are adapting to monitor and protect them.

I wanted to provide a respectful shout out (although not to blog posts) to products from several vendors that promise to better protect from threats such as the Mirai malware and other examples.

Full disclosure: I’m not receiving any incentives or benefits from any of these vendors; I simply wish to promote awareness of existing and upcoming technologies that we can use to better secure the increasing number of IoT devices that we are using in our everyday lives.

For example, early last week Symantec began accepting pre-orders for their new wireless router. Initially this will only be available in the US but will be extended to more regions in the future.

While a wireless router is nothing new, it is one of first that I have encountered that includes protection for Internet of Things (IoT) devices.

In their words it “constantly monitors your connected devices like WiFi thermostats, smart locks, appliances or home security cameras for suspicious activity and identifies vulnerabilities. If a device becomes compromised, it quarantines the threat before it spreads ensuring your digital world is safe.”

A similarly powerful offering from F-Secure is also in progress. Like Symantec, F-Secure’s is scheduled for release in Q2 of 2017.

These solutions are further refinements to wireless router/access point security solutions that have been available since late 2015. For example, Asus’ Ai-Protection feature (using technology licensed from Trend Micro) incorporates most of the features that F-Secure and Symantec offer just without the IoT management and reporting.

There are interesting times ahead as Internet of Things (IoT) devices and wireless router become increasingly more managed and monitored devices allowing us to secure them better. My sincere thanks to a colleague (you know who you are!) for assistance with this post.

Thank you.

Blog Post Shout Out: SHA-1 Migration and Internet of Things (IoT)

With the transition to SHA-2 rapidly approaching (January 2017) if you have not already begun the migration process for your website or are having difficulties locating all of the certificates that need migrating; the following article that I wish to provide a respectful shout out to may be of assistance. The article includes advice on making the best use of the remaining time:

SHA-1 Time Bomb: One Third of Websites Have Yet to Upgrade by Phill Muncaster (Infosecurity Magazine)

This issue is also of note since Google (like the other browser vendors is moving away from SHA-1) will remove support for SHA-1 in Chrome version 56. Further details are provided in their blog post. The source of the statistics for the Infosecurity Magazine article was this blog post from Venafi, an organisation that provides cryptography related solutions and services to enterprises.

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With the DDoS attack (defined) against the DNS service Dyn last month attributed to Internet of Things (defined) devices further steps need to be taken to secure them. To assist with this, the US CERT have written a PDF document titled “Strategic Principles for Securing the IoT”. It is intended for consumers, operators and manufacturers of IoT devices. It is available from the link below:

Securing the Internet of Things (US-CERT)

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Thank you.

Blog Post Shout Out March 2016: Focus on Internet of Things (IoT)

With the increasing popularity of standard everyday appliances and devices e.g. webcams, thermostats, TVs all way up to critical infrastructure e.g. power and water treatment plants being connected to the internet, we need to take measures to better defend them against attack. This is necessary since many devices were not designed/built with security in mind.

To assist you with better securing these devices I wanted to provide a respectful shout-out to following blog posts/articles that will help you defend your devices whether they be installed in a corporate environment or your home:

7 tips for securing the Internet of Things by Chester Wisniewski (Sophos Security)

5 Tips to Protect Networks Against Shodan Searches by Aaron Weiss (eSecurityPlanet)

Should CIOs worry about the Internet of Hackable Things? by Jen A. Miller (CIO.com)

These resources should better prepare you for any potential/actual attacks against these devices. Thank you.