Security of Selected IoT Devices Tested

The current level of security present in Internet of Things (IoT)(defined) devices continues to be low and is in need of further maturity and consideration given to security and best practices.

A recent study carried out by researchers from Brazil’s Federal University of Pernambuco and the University of Michigan found that 31% of the apps (equating 37 out of 96 devices tested) used to control the IoT devices used no encryption while a further 19% used hard coded encryption keys (which can’t be changed). An attacker may be able to reverse engineer these.

The researcher then developed proof of concept attacks against five devices which are controlled by four apps:

Belkin’s WeMo for IoT
Broadlink’s e-Control app
TP-Link’s Kasa app
LIFX app used with that company’s Wi-Fi enabled light bulbs

From these 3 used no encryption while three apps communicated via broadcast messages that can provide an attacker a means of monitoring the nature/contents of the app to device communication. The researchers elaborated “A remote attacker simply has to find a way of getting the exploit either on the user’s smartphone in the form of an unprivileged app or a script on the local network”.

For the TP-Link Smart Plug which was reviewed more than 10k times on Amazon shares an encryption key across a given product line while the initial set up is performed using the app without strict authentication.

How to secure your IoT devices:
The researchers pointed out that Google’s Nest thermostat app was a better example of how security should be done. Its configuration can be carried out over TLS to the cloud or via Wi-Fi with WPA. This app also offers 2 factor authentication (defined) (albeit only via SMS messages which are themselves not best practice).

However, the Nest and any IoT rely on you to practice good security e.g. not re-using passwords for researching how best to secure that device. This story linked to is an example of what can happen if you don’t:

Further tips on securing IoT devices are listed provided below with a further tip of “Track and assess devices” from CSO Online. Devices such as Amazon Echo, Apple HomePod and Google Home require even more steps (final link below):

7 tips for securing the Internet of Things by Chester Wisniewski (Sophos Security)

8 tips to secure those IoT devices by Michelle Drolet (CSO Online)]

Securing the Internet of Things (US-CERT)

9 things to check after installing wireless access points by Eric Geier (Computerworld)

Securing Your Smart TV

Increasing the privacy and security of virtual assistants

Thank you.

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