Linux GRUB Security Vulnerability Swiftly Patched

Earlier this month a pair of security researchers within the Cybersecurity Group at Universitat Politècnica de València discovered an integer underflow (defined) vulnerability within the Linux GRUB bootloader (defined, my thanks to Lucian Constantin, IDG News Service for providing an excellent summary of the purpose/function of the GRUB bootloader within that article). The researchers responsibly disclosed (defined) this issue to the main distributors of Linux in order to protect their users. My thanks to everyone involved for so quickly addressing this vulnerability.

Why Should This Issue Be Considered Important?
This issue is very easy for an attacker to exploit namely that they only need to have physical access (be in front of the system) for a short time in order to exploit it. With this access, they simply press the backspace key (just above the main Enter/Carriage return) key 28 times in order to exploit this vulnerability. They could easily obtain this physical access by breaking into the premises where such a system is located.

Moreover, systems with defences such as disabled CR-ROM drives (otherwise known as optical drives), disabled USB ports, restricted network boot options, password protected BIOS/UEFI firmware (defined), password protected GRUB edit mode and where the hard disk/SSD (solid state drive (defined)) is encrypted can all be bypassed by exploiting this vulnerability.

The researchers in their description of this vulnerability bypass the encryption of the hard disk/SSD by infecting the system (by means of this vulnerability) and allowing the user to decrypt the data (information disclosure) for the attackers by having the legitimate user enter the correct password as they log on normally to the system (an elevation of privilege attack (defined); since the attackers would not normally have this level of access). A denial of service attack (DoS)(the concept of DoS is defined here) can also be carried out by the attacker by corrupting the encrypted data and/or the GRUB leaving the legitimate user unable to access their own data.

Before bypassing the encryption however, they also describe patching (modifying the genuine/legitimate GRUB loader) so that it always authenticates the logged on user rather than asking for a password (bypassing the password protected edit mode of GRUB mentioned above).

Next they describe using the patched GRUB loader to load a Linux kernel so that they can then install malware of their choice. This also has the advantage that logging of their actions is not recorded since the syslog daemon (defined) is not running (carrying out it’s purpose) since the bash (Bourne-Again SHell)(defined) is the first process to run.

With that shell (defined) running on the system the researchers next describe how they illustrated a proof of their concept by installing a modified library (the general concept of a code library is defined here, only Windows systems use DLLs (defined) and so are not relevant for this discussion of Linux systems) belonging to Mozilla Firefox so that when Firefox is active, code (instructions) of their choice are also carried out. This code uses Netcat (defined) to set up a reverse shell (defined) allowing them to control the victim system as if they were in front of it (in this case the researchers show the reverse shell being able to access the private data folders belonging to the logged in user).

How Can I Protect Myself From This Issue?
Debian, Ubuntu and Red Hat (among others) have released updates to GRUB to address this vulnerability. For Linux systems the relevant updates can also be obtained via the Package Manager bundled with your Linux distribution (see this link(Debian) and this link (Ubuntu) that should assist you in using the package manager for your distribution of Linux).

Thank you.

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